Program
 
Wed Sep 02 2020
12:00 - 12:05
ISGS Online School Presentation
Speakers
Chair not set
12:05 - 12:20
Speakers-I1
Innocenzi, Plinio
University of Sassari, Italy
TBC
Innocenzi, Plinio
University of Sassari, Italy, IT
Authors
Plinio Innocenzi a
Affiliations
a, University of Sassari and INSTM, Italy
Abstract
12:20 - 12:35
Speakers-I2
Subrahmanyam, Raman
Hamburg University of Technology
TBC
Subrahmanyam, Raman
Hamburg University of Technology, DE
Authors
Raman Subrahmanyam a
Affiliations
a, Technical University of Hamburg, Germany
Abstract
12:35 - 13:05
Panel Discussion
Speakers
Chair not set
13:05 - 13:20
Speakers-I1
Levy, David
Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain.
Sol-Gel Materials and Coatings for Optical Applications
Levy, David
Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain., ES
Authors
David Levy a
Affiliations
a, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain., C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Madrid, ES
Abstract

Hybrid materials have been of interest to the materials community since the first contributions in that field. The development of hybrid sol-gel coatings during the last years turned out to be the highly demanded by the industrial sector, due to their capability to induce new properties in a wide variety of materials. The possibility of incorporating organic dopants into transparent matrices allowed the preparation of many different hybrid materials (including room temperature prepared hybrid metal oxides particles) that find application in the field of optics and other related applications. These new materials were mainly applied as thin-films coating in whose porosity the dopant molecules are allocated or attached to the hybrid network. These matrices can be tailor made to design both, the properties of the matrix itself and the properties of the pore cage, in terms of pore size and chemical environment, which will have an important effect on the performance of the developed material.

The most representative contributions of the SGG@Madrid in the field of hybrid materials for optics and electrooptics will be presented: Hybrid coatings for applications as smart windows, materials that show high photostability under UV radiation as protection coatings, coatings for optical lenses and photochromic materials, biofilms created by the bacterium Pseudomona putida mt-2 for the fabrication of a variable light-transmission device, and nanosensors for space applications.

During the last 20 years, hybrid materials for optics and photonics have reached a quite mature situation, with some products already available in the market. However, many difficulties related to the replacement of existing technologies make it difficult to fully accomplish some of the new proposed challenges and developments. There is still much work to do in terms of multidisciplinary research in the areas of chemistry and physics to exploit this technical opportunity of creating novel materials that satisfy the requirements of a variety of applications and devices in which important contributions are expected in the coming years from novel approaches for hybrid functional sol-gel materials.

13:20 - 13:35
Speakers-I2
Castro, Yolanda
Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (CSIC)
Sol-Gel Processing: A good alternative to control the corrosion of metal and alloys
Castro, Yolanda
Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (CSIC), ES
Authors
Yolanda Castro a
Affiliations
a, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (CSIC), C/ Kelsen 5. Campus de Cantoblanco, Madrid, ES
Abstract

Different alternatives can be considered to increase the corrosion resistance of metals being the surface modification by deposition of coatings and especially by using sol-gel process one of the most suitable. This process is one of the key technologies to prepare efficient anti-corrosive coatings with well-known advantages, including relative low processing temperatures, good covalent bonding and strong adhesion to the substrate, a wide range of compositions and properties, etc.

Inorganic sol-gel coatings have been proposed as good barrier against oxygen diffusion. Coatings prepared from TEOS demonstrated to act as good barrier improving the oxidation resistance of stainless steels and other metals and alloys. However, the protective properties of these coatings against electrochemical corrosion are low due to the presence of residual porosity or micro-cracks that enable the access of the electrolyte to the substrate. In this sense, the use of hybrid organic–inorganic sol–gel coatings with interpenetrated networks effectively improved the performance of these coatings. In this case, the organic component provides ductility and facilitates the stress relaxation in the inorganic network; thus, it allows obtaining a drastic increase in thickness without cracking of coatings. In general, the control of the synthesis parameters, the incorporation of different organic monomers and inorganic nanoparticles allows obtaining materials with the desired properties like density, hydrophilic character and coatings which act as physical barrier. However, corrosive ions still can diffuse through micro-pores and attack the metallic substrate, producing their degradation when they are exposed to aggressive medium. Thereby, a recent trend is the development of sol–gel coatings doped with environmentally friendly inhibitors. The combination of hybrid silica coatings with systems based on cerium or other rare earths, or organic inhibitors are regarded as promising candidates to combine passive and active corrosion protection and self-healing ability.

13:35 - 13:50
Speakers-I3
Klein, Lisa
Rutgers University, Newark, US
Reversible Melting Hybrids
Klein, Lisa
Rutgers University, Newark, US, US
Authors
Lisa Klein a
Affiliations
a, Rutgers University, Materials Science and Engineering, US, Nueva Jersey, EE. UU., US
Abstract

Using a sol-gel process, it is possible to prepare transparent hybrid glasses that are rigid at room temperature, but soften and flow around 110ºC.  Combinations of mono-substituted alkoxysilanes and di-substituted alkoxysilanes give a range of viscosities, glass transition temperatures and consolidation temperatures.  This softening quality gives rise to “melting gels”.  The softening and rigidifying is reversible until the “melting gels” are heated above the consolidation temperature for 1 day, after which they no longer soften.  Applications for melting gels include hermetic coatings for corrosion protection [1], hosts for plasmonic nanoparticles [2], matrices for phase change materials, self-limiting electrospray films on contoured parts [3], and imprinted surfaces for water harvesting.

13:50 - 14:40
Panel Discussion
14:40 - 15:00
Break
15:00 - 16:30
ePoster Session
 
Thu Sep 03 2020
12:00 - 12:05
ISGS Online Summer School Presentation
Speakers
Chair not set
12:05 - 12:20
Speakers-I1
Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
CIC biomaGUNE, Donosti, ES
Hybrid Plasmonic Materials for Biosensing
Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
CIC biomaGUNE, Donosti, ES, ES

Luis Liz-Marzán is Ikerbasque Research Professor and Scientific Director at CIC biomaGUNE, in San Sebastian (Spain). He graduated in chemistry from the University of Santiago de Compostela, was postdoc at Utrecht University and Professor at the University of Vigo (1995–2012). He has also been Invited Professor at various institutions worldwide. Liz-Marzán received numerous research awards, including a Humboldt research award, ACS Nano lecture award, Medal of the Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry, National Chemistry Award and 2 ERC Advanced Grants. He is also member of the Royal Spanish Academy of Sciences and of Academia Europaea. He is co-author of over 480 publications and 8 patents, and has delivered over 400 invited lectures. He is currently associate editor of ACS Nano and serves in the editorial boards of various other journals, including Science. His major research activity is devoted to understand the growth mechanisms of metal nanocrystals, to tailor their surface chemistry, thereby directing their self-assembly. He also works on the design of biomedical applications based on the plasmonic properties of well-defined metal nanoparticles and nanostructures, including surface enhanced Raman scattering.

Authors
Luis M. Liz-Marzán a, b, c
Affiliations
a, CIDETEC, Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Donostia, ES, Paseo de Miramón, 196, San Sebastián, ES
b, IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, ES, Bilbao, ES
c, Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials, and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN, Spain, ES
Abstract

Metal nanoparticles display very interesting optical properties, related to localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), which give rise to well-defined absorption and scattering peaks in the visible and near-IR spectral range. Such resonances can be tuned through the size and shape of the nanoparticles, but are also extremely sensitive towards dielectric changes in the near proximity of the particles surface. Therefore, metal nanoparticles have been proposed as ideal candidates for biosensing applications. Additionally, surface plasmon resonances are characterized by large electric fields at the surface, which are responsible for the so-called surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, which has rendered Raman spectroscopy a powerful analytical technique that allows ultrasensitive chemical or biochemical analysis, since the Raman scattering cross sections can be enhanced up to 10 orders of magnitude, so that very small amounts of analyte can be detected.

In this communication, we present several examples of novel strategies to employ nanostructured materials comprising gold nanoparticles embedded in porous oxides or polymers, as substrates for ultrasensitive detection of various analytes, including biorelevant molecules such as bacterial quorum sensing markers, which require the design of novel techniques for trapping them close to the metal nanostructures or to avoid signal contamination by larger biomolecules. Hybrid colloidal nanomaterials will also be introduced as SERS-encoded tags for cell identification and bioimaging.

 

Keywords: Plasmonics, SERS, Biosensing, Bioimaging

 

References

M.N. Sanz-Ortiz, K. Sentosun, S. Bals, L.M. Liz-Marzán, ACS Nano 2015, 9, 10489-10497.

G. Bodelón, V. Montes-García, V. López-Puente, E.H. Hill, C. Hamon, M.N. Sanz-Ortiz, S. Rodal-Cedeira, C. Costas, S. Celiksoy, I. Pérez-Juste, L. Scarabelli, A. La Porta, J. Pérez-Juste, I. Pastoriza-Santos, L.M. Liz-Marzán, Nature Materials 2016, 15, 1203-1211

 

 

 

 

12:20 - 12:35
Speakers-I2
Roig, Anna
Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC
Nanocellulose-based materials and devices
Roig, Anna
Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC, ES
Authors
Anna Roig a
Affiliations
a, Nanoparticles and Nanocomposites Group (www.icmab.es/nn), Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC) (www.icmab.es ), Campus UAB, Bellaterra, SPAIN
Abstract

In the quest for a more circular economy cellulose is expected to play a strategic role in replacing petroleum-based polymers. Increasing demand for cost-effective sustainable and high-performance materials makes nanocelluloses, which combine the properties of cellulose with the high surface area of nanomaterials, attractive for applications in sectors such as photonics, food packaging, flexible electronics or biomaterials. In particular, bacterial nanocellulose (BC) produced by microbial fermentation with the same molecular formula as plant-derived cellulose but with a higher degree of polymerization, purity and crystallinity has captured the interest of material scientists. 

We exploit BC exceptional features to create advanced materials. First, I will describe  an original route to attain a multi-nanoparticle millefeuille for a BC-layered construct (Figure 1) [1] and then I will present some BC potential applications in energy (thermoelectrics [2] and photovoltaics [3]) and health [4] (corneal bandage [5] and as cell culture supports [6])

Figure 1. Bacterial cellulose films with multiple functional nanoparticles in confined spatial distribution

References

[1] S. Roig-Sanchez, E. Jungstedt, I. Anton-Sales, D. C. Malaspina, J. Faraudo, L. Berglund, A. Laromaine, A. Roig, Nanoscale Horizons, 4, 3 (2019) 634.

[3] D. A.-Fatouh., B. Dörling, O. Zapata-Arteaga, X. Rodríguez-Martínez, A. Gómez, J. S. Reparaz, A. Laromaine, A. Roig, M. Campoy-Quiles, Energy & Environmental Science, 12 (2019) 716.

[4] J.P. Jurado, B. Dörling, O. Zapata-Arteaga, A. Roig, A. Mihi, M. Campoy-Quiles, Adv. Energy Mater. (2019) 1902385

[5] I. Anton-Sales, U. Beekmann, A. Laromaine, A. Roig, D. Kralisch, Current Drug Targets 20(8) (2019)808

[6] I. Anton-Sales, J. Christopher D’Antin, J. Fernández-Engroba, V. Charoenrook, A. Laromaine, A. Roig, R. Michael, Biomaterials Science 8 (2020) 2921

[7] T. Tronser, A. Laromaine, A. Roig, P.A. Levkin, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 10 (2018) (19) 16260.

12:35 - 13:05
Panel Discussion
Speakers
Chair not set
13:05 - 13:20
Speakers-I1
Parola, Stephane
ENS Lyon
Monolithic xerogels and aerogels, synthesis strategies and applications
Parola, Stephane
ENS Lyon, FR
Authors
Stephane Parola a
Affiliations
a, Laboratoire de Chimie, ENS de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France
Abstract

Monolithic materials are 3D architectures that can be prepared from inorganic, hybrid or composite systems. Applications are for instance in the fields of optics, sensing, insulation, energy. The lecture will be devoted to an introduction to the different strategies that can be used to obtain such material, from sol-gel molecular aproaches operating through alkoxide hydrolysis-condensation followed by solvent removal (drying, supercritical drying) to 3D controlled assemblyes of nanobuilding blocks reacting together and further thermal treatment. Control of the final microstructure and porosity will be discussed. Optical properties confered by the confinement of molecular dyes or nanoparticles in the monoliths will also be presented. Advantages and drawbacks of the different methods will be adressed. 

13:20 - 13:35
Speakers-I2
Ferreira, Rute
University of Aveiro
TBC
Ferreira, Rute
University of Aveiro
Authors
Rute Ferreira a
Affiliations
a, University of Aveiro, Portugal
Abstract
13:35 - 14:05
Panel Discussion
 
Posters
Jaime González Cuadra, Samuel Porcar, Gina Soracá, Diego Fraga Chiva, Juan Bautista Carda, Teodora Stoyanova
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