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Program
 
Tue May 11 2021
10:00 - 10:05
nanoGe - Introduction
10:05 - 10:20
Session 1 - Introduction by Quinten Akkerman
Session 1A - Synthesis and characterisation
Chair: Quinten Akkerman
10:20 - 11:20
characterisation-I1
Zhong, Haizheng
Beijing Institute of Technology
In-situ Fabricated Perovskite Quantum Dots:From Synthesis to Applications
Zhong, Haizheng
Beijing Institute of Technology, CN

Haizheng Zhong is a professor of photonic materials in the school of materials science and Engineering at Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT). He obtained his B.E. degree in 2003 from Jilin University, and then undertook his Ph.D. studies at the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ICCAS) from 2003 to 2008. During 2017/04-2017/10, he spent 6 months in UCLA as a visiting student. After that, he worked as  postdoc in  the University of Toronto during 2008–2010. He joined School of Materials Science & Engineering at Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) as an associate professor in 2010 and was promoted to full professor in 2013. His current research interests are in the area of colloidal quantum dots for photonics and optoelectronics. His recent awards include Xu-Rong Xu Luminescence Best Paper Award (2013), the National Science Foundation for Excellent Young Scholars (2017), Beijing Science and Technology Award (2018, 2/10), 2019 IDW best paper award. Since 2019, he serves as senior editor for The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters and moved to executive editor in 2020.

 

Authors
Haizheng Zhong a
Affiliations
a, Beijing Institute of Technology, Zhongguancun South Street, Beijing, 100081, CN
Abstract

Perovskite quantum dots (QDs) are now emerging as low cost functional materials for many photonic applications due to their superior optical properties and easy fabrication. Recently, we developed the in-situ fabrication of hybrid perovskite QDs in polymeric films (PQDF) with high transparency, superior photoluminescence emission and additional processing benefits for down-shifting applications. The potential use of PQDF as color converters in LCD backlights was successfully demonstrated, showing bright potential in display technology. Very recently, a dual green and red emissive composite film was developed for Mini-LED backlighting applications. Moreover, we further explored the electroluminescence devices based in-situ fabricated perovskite QDs. We illustrated the enhancing role of ligand-assisted reprecipitation (LARP) process and obtained uniform FAPbX3 (X=Br, Cl, I) perovskite QDs films with photoluminescence quantum yield up to 78%. The electroluminescence devices with a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 16.3%, 15.8% and 8.8% were achieved for green, red and blue devices, showing the promising to achieve high efficiency. In all, the in-situ fabrication strategy provides very convenient route for display technology. In this talk, I will introduce the progress on the development of in-situ fabricated perovskite quantum dots toward other photonic and optoelectronic applications.

11:20 - 11:50
Discussion
11:50 - 12:00
Coffee Break
12:00 - 13:00
characterisation-I2
Altantzis, Thomas
Universiteit Antwerpen
Fundamentals and recent advances in transmission electron microscopy
Altantzis, Thomas
Universiteit Antwerpen
Authors
Thomas Altantzis a, Sara Bals a
Affiliations
a, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Wilrijk, 2610, BE
Abstract

Nanomaterials have attracted enormous attention over the last few decades thanks to their improved properties and utility in a plethora of scientific areas including catalysis and electrochemistry. Different parameters such as structure, morphology, chemical composition and the presence of defects directly affect the properties of nanomaterials. A detailed characterization of these parameters is of uttermost importance if one wants to obtain a better insight concerning the structure-to-property connection. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is an ideal technique to investigate materials at both the nanometer and atomic scale and has therefore been widely used in the study of nanomaterials. [1] By combining the technique with tomography, a technique which derives three-dimensional (3D) information from two-dimensional (2D) projections, one is able to determine the structure and shape of nanostructures in 3D, even with atomic resolution. [2-3] Furthermore, when combined with spectroscopic techniques such as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for the determination of the composition and even oxidation state of nanomaterials both in 2D and 3D. [4-5] Nanomaterials are widely used in many electrochemical and catalytic reactions, which typically occur at elevated temperatures, pressures and liquid environments. In such conditions unwanted structural, morphological and compositional changes take place which in turn affect dramatically the catalytic performance. Indeed catalyst degradation is a major problem and has been a matter of intense study for many years. However, only little is known about the changes occurring at the nanometer and atomic scale when nanomaterials are exposed to aggressive chemical environments. During the last decade, specialized in-situ gas and liquid cell, as well as heating TEM holders are available. By using such holders, one can reach higher pressures and temperatures and also introduce liquids in the microscopes, and therefore create an environment which is identical to that during actual catalytic reactions. [6-8] In this talk, an introduction to the fundamentals of TEM and its capabilities will be given, followed by an overview of the most recent advances in the field of in-situ characterization both at the nanometer and the atomic scale in 3D.

References [1] Adv. Mater., 2012, 24, 5655 [2] Nature, 2011, 470, 374 [3] Nat. Mater. 2012, 11, 930 [4] Nano Lett., 2014, 14, 2747 [5] ACS Nano, 2014, 8, 10878 [6] Acc. Chem. Res., 2016, 49, 2015 [7] Nano Lett., 2019, 19, 477-481 [8] Acc. Chem. Res., 2021, 54, 1189-1199

13:00 - 13:30
Discussion
13:30 - 14:30
Long Break
Session 1A.2 - Synthesis and characterisation
Chair: Quinten Akkerman
14:30 - 15:30
characterisation-I1
De Roo, Jonathan
University of Basel
The surface chemistry of nanocrystals, elucidated by NMR
De Roo, Jonathan
University of Basel, CH
Authors
Jonathan De Roo a
Affiliations
a, University of Basel, Spitalstrasse, 51, Basel, CH
Abstract

Ligands (aka surfactants, adsorbents, etc) are an essential part of Quantum Dots. In this tutorial talk, I will focus on organic ligands and first explain how they influence the Quantum Dot solubility (aka dispersibility or colloidal stability) in nonpolar and polar solvents. Second, I will introduce Nucleation Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and show how this powerful tool allows (i) discerning bound from free ligands, (ii) quantifying the solvation of the ligand shell (iii) providing access to the (heterogeneous) thermodynamics of ligand binding, etc. We will also discuss the classification of different types of ligands and how one can use this to predict ligand exchange. Finally, note that none of the above is specific for quantum dots but actually applies to all types of nanocrystals.

15:30 - 16:00
Discussion
16:00 - 16:15
Coffee Break
16:15 - 17:15
characterisation-I2
M. Cossairt, Brandi
University of Washington, US
QD Nucleation and Growth – Beyond Classical Mechanisms
M. Cossairt, Brandi
University of Washington, US, US
Authors
Brandi M. Cossairt a
Affiliations
a, University of Washington
Abstract

In this seminar we will explore quantum dot nucleation and growth, with a particular focus on mechanisms beyond the classical regime. Over the past several decades of colloidal semiconductor research, a wide variety of chemical systems have been explored to access II/VI, IV/VI, and III/V semiconductor nanomaterials. A classical understanding of nucleation and growth provides a reasonable explanation for some of these systems. It has become increasingly apparent, however, that the behavior of particle growth in many systems appreciably deviates from that predicted by classical nucleation theory. This deviation can simply affect particle size or can lead to entirely new morphologies and materials. While a complete, systematic understanding of these nonclassical pathways is an ongoing research effort, we will focus on two main concepts: the formation of kinetically persistent nuclei, that is, nanoclusters, and the non-atomistic growth of larger particles and assemblies.

17:15 - 17:45
Discussion
17:45 - 18:45
Happy hour
 
Wed May 12 2021
10:00 - 10:05
nanoGe - Introduction
10:05 - 10:10
Session 2A - Introduction by Liberato Manna
Session 2A - Optical properties and spectroscopy
Chair: Liberato Manna
10:10 - 11:10
spectroscopy-I1
Moreels, Iwan
Gent University - BE
Tuning the Optoelectronic Properties of Colloidal 2D Nanocrystals for Photonic and Energy Applications
Moreels, Iwan
Gent University - BE, BE

I obtained my PhD degree in applied physics at Ghent University in 2009, studying near-infrared lead salt quantum dots. This was followed by a postdoc on quantum dot emission dynamics at Ghent University in collaboration with the IBM Zurich research lab. In 2012 I joined the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, where I led the Nanocrystal Photonics Lab in the Nanochemistry Department. In 2017 I returned to Ghent University as associate professor, focusing mostly on 2D and strained nanocrystals. The research in our group ranges from the synthesis of novel fluorescent nanocrystals to optical spectroscopy and photonic applications.

Authors
Iwan Moreels a
Affiliations
a, Department of Chemistry, Ghent University, Belgium, Krijgslaan 281-S3, Ghent, BE
Abstract

Two-dimensional colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs) are solution-processed materials with a particular shape, that can be designed toward unique absorption and emission properties. Importantly, optimization of the chemical synthesis goes hand in hand with insights into the optoelectronic properties, obtained from linear and nonlinear absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and calculations of the nanocrystal band structure.

In this talk, I will discuss recent progress made for CdSe-based 2D nanocrystals, featuring CdSe/ZnS type-I core/shell NPLs with fast, color-tunable emission, suitable as phospors for lasing or LEDs, as well as doped CdSe:Ag NPLs and CdSe/CdTe NPLs with a type-II band offset, which in both cases exhibit fluorescence that is strongly Stokes shifted and has a lifetime beyond 100 ns, which can find application in energy harvesting. For the latter, we were able to insert an intermediate CdS tunneling barrier at the CdSe/CdTe interface, and obtain red and near-infrared to green fluorescence upconversion. This flexibility to design NPL heterostructures has led to a wide range of applications, from light emitting devices, to ultrafast scintillators and luminescent solar concentrators.

11:10 - 11:40
Discussion
11:40 - 11:55
Coffee Break
11:55 - 12:55
spectroscopy-I2
Infante, Ivan
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT)
Computational Chemistry for Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals
Infante, Ivan
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), IT
Authors
Ivan Infante a
Affiliations
a, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), IT
Abstract

While experimental protocols aimed at the synthesis and characterization of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are now well established, theoretical calculations of the same materials still present many challenges. Some of these are: (1) the compromise in the size of the modelled systems, which have to be large enough to avoid too strong quantum confinement effects but small enough to be described computationally; (2) the construction of a nanocrystal model system that represent closely that found in the experiment, and (3) the possibility of adding surface ligands that increase dramatically the computational requirements.

A successful methodology to tackle some of the above issues is Density Functional Theory (DFT), which scales cubically with the number of atoms, but that in recent years was capable to provide important insights in the electronic structure and geometry of several colloidal nanocrystals of up to 3nm in size. However, a strong limitation of DFT is the high computational cost, which prevent on the one hand the inclusion of solvent and ligand molecules as in the experiments and on the other, performing long timescale simulations to study rare events like ligand binding at the surface, trap formation rates and phonon induced non-radiative quenching. To address these chemico-physical processes, the field moved to computationally cheaper alternatives such as those based on classical force fields. These methods however have also important drawbacks, such as the development of accurate force-field parameters and more importantly the lack of information on the electronic structure of the material studied. In this framework, novel machine-learning techniques are poised to bridge the gap between DFT and classical force fields to enable DFT quality simulations on colloidal nanocrystals also for long timescale events.  

In this talk I will therefore discuss the most important achievements obtained in the semiconductor nanocrystal field by theoretical methodologies and an outlook of future developments.

12:55 - 13:25
Discussion
13:25 - 14:20
Long Break
Session 2A.2 - Optical properties and spectroscopy
Chair: Liberato Manna
14:20 - 15:20
spectroscopy-I1
Raino, Gabriele
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich
Chemically synthesized quantum light sources
Raino, Gabriele
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich, CH
Authors
Gabriele Raino a
Affiliations
a, ETH Zurich
Abstract

The tremendous advancement in material growth by colloidal synthetic procedures has allowed the properties of several compounds to be tailored with nanoscale precision, accelerating the development of optoelectronic devices, such as laser, LEDs and TV display technologies. At the single particle level, individual nanocrystal acts as an artificial atom, and they are capable to generate quantum light (e.g. single photons). In this lecture, we will review the main excitations in nanoscale materials, the radiative and non-radiative exciton recombination dynamics and their impact on the generation of quantum light. Examples of efficient quantum light sources will be presented, their peculiar photon statistics, with a detailed description of the experimental methods used to characterize them.

15:20 - 15:50
Discussion
15:50 - 16:00
Coffee Break
16:00 - 17:00
spectroscopy-I2
D. Schaller, Richard
Optically Triggered Lattice and Carrier Dynamics in Quantum Dots and 2D Nanomaterials
D. Schaller, Richard
Authors
Richard D. Schaller a, b
Affiliations
a, Argonne National Lab
b, Northwestern University
Abstract

Semiconductor nanomaterials such as zero-dimensional quantum dots and two-dimensional quantum well-like nanoplatelets can be produced colloidally on large scale with precise control over ensemble optical properties. Quantum confinement in such systems offers size-tunable energy gap, strong photoluminescence, and, in some cases desirable properties such as optical gain and lasing. The role of thermal energy deposition and dissipation in these nanoscopic structures can impact including radiative rate and material stability, but has not been substantively probed. We have pursued ultrafast optical pump, X-ray diffraction probe experiments as well as optical studies on nanoparticle dispersions as functions of particle size, polytype, and pump intensity to examine lattice response. Shifts of diffraction peaks relate lattice heating and peak amplitude reduction conveys transient lattice disordering (or melting). Intraband and Auger-derived heating is clearly observed in lattice dynamics, and disordering is observed upon absorption of larger numbers of photons excitations per NC on average. Diffraction intensity recovery kinetics, attributable to recrystallization, occur over hundreds of picoseconds with slower recoveries for larger particles. Solid-solid phase transitions can also become apparent with disappearance/appearance of particular diffraction peaks.[1] Transient optical studies using mid-infrared pump photons can monitor thermalization timescales via vibrational excitation of ligands followed by heating of the inorganic core, thus revealing information regarding the inorganic-organic interface. These methods and findings suggest means to probe nanomaterial physical response, stability and transient electronic structure applications such as lasing and solid-state lighting.

17:00 - 17:30
Discussion
17:30 - 18:30
Poster Session
 
Thu May 13 2021
12:30 - 12:35
nanoGe - Introduction
12:35 - 12:40
Session 3A - Introduction by Sergio Brovelli
Session 3A - Quantum dot devices
Chair: Sergio Brovelli
12:40 - 13:40
devices-I1
Loi, Maria Antonietta
University of Groningen, The Netherlands
QD solar cells: past, present and future
Loi, Maria Antonietta
University of Groningen, The Netherlands, NL

Maria Antonietta Loi studied physics at the University of Cagliari in Italy where she received the PhD in 2001. In the same year she joined the Linz Institute for Organic Solar cells, of the University of Linz, Austria as a post doctoral fellow. Later she worked as researcher at the Institute for Nanostructured Materials of the Italian National Research Council in Bologna Italy. In 2006 she became assistant professor and Rosalind Franklin Fellow at the Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. She is now full professor in the same institution and chair of the Photophysics and OptoElectronics group. She has published more than 130 peer review articles in photophysics and optoelectronics of nanomaterials. In 2012 she has received an ERC starting grant.

Authors
Maria Antonietta Loi a
Affiliations
a, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, Nijenborgh, 7, Groningen, NL
Abstract

Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are versatile solution-processable nanocrystals which have great promise for optoelectronic applications. Among the properties that make them unique are the large spectral tunability, the outstanding monodispersity, the solution processability and the good transport properties in thin films. Due to the quantum confinement effect, CQDs give rise to large variations in the bandgap. When using Pb chalcogenides the NIR and part of the visible spectra can be covered, which make them very interesting for many optoelectronic applications among which solar cells.  After a brief introduction to the physical properties of colloidal QDs, the state of the art and challenges in colloidal QD solar cells will be discussed.

13:40 - 14:10
Discussion
14:10 - 14:25
Coffee Break
14:25 - 15:25
devices-I2
Kagan, Cherie
University of Pennsylvania
Colloidal Nanocrystal Electronics
Kagan, Cherie
University of Pennsylvania, US
Cherie R. Kagan is the Stephen J. Angello Professor of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. Kagan graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1991 with a BSE in Materials Science and Engineering and a BA Mathematics. She earned her PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1996 working with Moungi G. Bawendi. In 1996, she went to Bell Labs as a postdoctoral fellow and in 1998, she joined IBM’s T. J. Watson Research Center, where she most recently managed the “Molecular Assemblies and Devices Group.” In 2007, she joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. Kagan is an Associate Editor of ACS Nano and serves on the editorial boards of Nano Letters and NanoToday. The Kagan group’s research interests are in the chemical and physical properties of nanostructured and organic materials and in integrating these materials in electronic, optoelectronic, optical, thermoelectric and bioelectronic devices. The group combines the flexibility of chemistry and bottom-up assembly with top-down fabrication techniques to design novel materials and devices. The group explores the structure and function of these materials and devices using spatially- and temporally-resolved optical spectroscopies, AC and DC electrical techniques, electrochemistry, scanning probe and electron microscopies and analytical measurements. Kagan is co-director of The Penn Center for Energy Innovation and serves on the World Economic Forum, Global Agenda Council on Nanotechnology; on the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences Materials Council; and on the advisory board of the US Summer Schools in Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. She served on the Materials Research Society’s Board of Directors from 2007-2009 and the editorial board of the ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces from 2008-2011
Authors
Cherie Kagan a
Affiliations
a, University of Pennsylvania, 200 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, 19104, US
Abstract

Nanometer-scale crystals of group IV, III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, I-III-VI2, and metal-halide perovskite semiconductors, capped by organic or inorganic ligands and dispersed in solvents, are known as colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) [Figure 1A,B] [1], [2]. Colloidal NCs form an excellent, solution-processable materials class for thin film and flexible electronics [Figure 1C-E]. In this tutorial, I will begin by describing the device physics of the thin-film, field-effect transistor. The field-effect transistor is a three-terminal, semiconductor device having metallic source, drain, and gate electrodes, a semiconductor channel (e.g., in this case a NC thin film), and gate dielectric layer which separates the gate from the semiconductor channel [Figure 1D]. Applying a voltage to the gate electrode creates an electric field across the gate dielectric material and modulates the carrier concentration and thus current between source and drain electrodes. I will then review the size, composition, and surface chemistry-dependent physical properties of semiconductor NCs and the arrangement and interparticle distance of NCs in thin films [Figure 1C], and connect these physio-chemical characteristics to the electronic properties of NC thin films and ultimately to advances reported in the performance of NC field-effect transistors. Next, I will share an accessible introduction to NC field-effect transistors as building blocks of electronic circuitry, giving examples of analog and digital circuit topologies and their functions. Device design and fabrication methods will be described that have enabled the scaling up in complexity and area and scaling down in device size of flexible, colloidal NC integrated circuits. Finally, taking stock of the advances made in the science and engineering of NC systems, I will describe challenges and opportunities to develop next-generation, colloidal NC electronic materials and devices, important to their potential in future computational and in Internet of Things applications.

Figure 1. (A) Schematic of a colloidal semiconductor NC composed of a nanometer-scale crystalline semiconductor core capped by ligands. (B) Photograph of a colloidal NC dispersion and (C) SEM images of glassy and ordered NC thin films. (D) Schematic of NC field-effect transistor device structure and (E) photograph of analog and digital NC integrated circuits fabricated on a 4” diameter flexible substrate.

15:25 - 15:55
Discussion
15:55 - 16:50
Long Break
Session 3A.2- Quantum dot devices
Chair: Sergio Brovelli
16:50 - 17:50
devices-I1
I. Klimov, Victor
Los Alamos National Laboratory, US
Prospects and Challenges of Colloidal Quantum Dot Laser Diodes
I. Klimov, Victor
Los Alamos National Laboratory, US, US

Victor I. Klimov is a Fellow of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Director of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics of the U.S. Department of Energy. He received his M.S. (1978), Ph.D. (1981), and D.Sc. (1993) degrees from Moscow State University. He is a Fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America, and a recipient of the Humboldt Research Award. His research interests include optical spectroscopy of semiconductor and metal nanostructures, carrier relaxation processes, strongly confined multiexcitons, energy and charge transfer, and fundamental aspects of photovoltaics.

Authors
Victor I. Klimov a
Affiliations
a, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Abstract

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals or ‘quantum dots’ (QDs) comprise an inorganic semiconductor core encased into a shell of organic ligand molecules. As a result, they combine superior light-emission characteristics of quantum-confined semiconductors with chemical flexibility and processability of molecular systems. Highly efficient, size-tunable emission from colloidal QDs has been already exploited in commercial televisions and displays. These materials can also enable highly flexible, solution processable laser diodes with an ultrawide range of accessible colours. However, the realization of such devices has been hampered by several problems including very fast optical gain decay due to nonradiative Auger recombination, and low conductivity and poor thermal stability of QD solids, that complicate achieving high current densities required for the lasing regime. Recently, these challenges have been successfully tackled via novel approaches to Auger decay engineering and special strategies for boosting current densities to ultrahigh values of ~1,000 A cm-2. These advances have brought the QD lasing community very close to its ultimate objective, which is the realization of a QD laser diode (QLD). Here, we overview the principles of light amplification with colloidal QDs, assess the status of the QD lasing field, examine the remaining challenges on a path to a QLD, and, finally, discuss practical strategies for attaining electrically pumped QD lasing.

17:50 - 18:20
Discussion
18:20 - 18:25
Poster Awards
18:25 - 18:30
Closure
 
Posters
Simone Sansoni, Michele De Bastiani, Erkan Aydin, Esma Ugur, Furkan Halis, Areej Al-Zahrani, Francesco Lamberti, Frederic Laquai, Moreno Meneghetti, Stefaan De Wolf
Eco-Friendly Spray Deposition of Perovskite Films on Macroscale Textured Surfaces
Mariano Calcabrini, Aziz Genç, Yu Liu, Tobias Kleinhanns, Seungho Lee, Dmitry N. Dirin, Quinten A. Akkerman, Maksym V. Kovalenko, Jordi Arbiol, Maria Ibáñez
Exploiting the Lability of Metal Halide Perovskites for Doping Semiconductor Nanocomposites
Gökhan Kara, Matthias Grotevent, Sami Bolat, Dominik Bachmann, Roman Furrer, Maksym Kovalenko, Michel Calame, Ivan Shorubalko
Charge Transport at Colloidal QDs/Graphene Interface for IR Light Detection
Fadi AL-Shnani, Zeger Hens, Iwan Moreels
Fluorescence Quantum Efficiency Enhancement in Size-Controlled 3.5 Monolayer Cadmium Telluride Nanoplatelets
David Macias, Carlos Echeverría, Iván Mora, Juan Ignacio Climente
Morphology and Band Structure of Orthorhombic PbS Nanoplatelets: An Indirect Band Gap Material
Stefano Toso, Dmitry Baranov, Davide Altamura, Francesco Scattarella, Jakob Dahl, Xingzhi Wang, Sergio Marras, Paul Alivisatos, Andrej Singer, Cinzia Giannini, liberato manna
Multilayer Diffraction Reveals That Colloidal Superlattices Approach the Structural Perfection of Single Crystals
Francisco Yarur Villanueva, Philippe B. Green, Shahnaj R. Ullah, Kirstin Buenviaje, Marek B. Majewski, Mark W.B. Wilson
Binary Copper Sulfide Templates Direct the Formation of Quaternary Cu2ZnSnS4 (Kesterite, Wurtzite) Nanocrystals
Andreas Manoli, Paris Papagiorgis, Caterina Bernasconi, Maryna Bodnarchuk, Maksym Kovalenko, Grigorios Itskos
Ligand-Dependent Optical Properties Of CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals
Magdalena Duda, Kamil Sobczak, Roman Minikayev, Elżbieta Dynowska, Łukasz Kłopotowski
Luminescent Nanothermometers Based on CuInS2/ZnS Colloidal Nanocrystals
Susan Cooper, Jette Mathiesen, Andy Anker, Kirsten Jensen
Mechanistic and Structural Insight into the Formation of Non-stoichiometric Cooper Sulfide Nanoparticles with Total X-ray Scattering
Ranjan Kumar, Leepsa Mishra, Manas Kumar
Impact of Anion Exchange in Inorganic Perovskite on the Energy Transfer with Core/Shell Quantum Dots

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